Article Archive

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Volume 2, Issue 1

 

 

Do phytoestrogens affect reproductive performance in male rats?

 

Journal of Infertility and reproductive Biology, 2014, Volume 2, Issue 1, Pages 1-5, Full Text in PDF (71.6 KB)

 

Meena R1, Sreenivasula Reddy P2*

 

1. Department of Biotechnology, S.V. University, Tirupati – 517502, India
2. Department of Zoology, S.V. University, Tirupati– 517502, India

 

Abstract

Daidzein and genistein are important soy-borne phytoestrogens that have been implicated in human health. In this study, independent effects of diadzein and genistein were tested on fertility output in male rats. Adult male Wistar rats (90 days old) were subjected to weekly injections of 2, 20, 100 mg/kg BW daidzein or genistein dissolved in DMSO for 8 weeks. Following treatment, control and experimental males were cohabited with sexually mature normal females for 5 days. Female rats were sacrificed and autopsy was performed on day 18 of pregnancy when uterus and ovaries were examined for the numbers ofcorpora lutea, implantations, dead and live fetuses and resorptions. No significant changes (p>0.05) were observed in the body weight gain of experimental males. Similarly, no changes (p>0.05) were observed in themating and fertility index. In contrast, significant decrease (p<0.05) was observed in fertility rate, measured by counting numbers of live fetuses in the uterus offemales mated
with males exposed to either daidzein or genistein.Females mated to daidzein exposed males showed resorptions and a significant decrease (p<0.05) in number of live fetuses per rat. These data demonstrate that significant decrease in fertilization capacity of adult male rats exposed to either daidzein or genistein.

 

 

Keywords: Daidzein, Genistein, Fertility, Implantation loss, Rat

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Testicular histomorphometry and endocrine alterations at puberty in offsprings from mercury treated rats

 

Journal of Infertility and reproductive Biology, 2014, Volume 2, Issue 1, Pages 6-10, Full Text in PDF (144 KB)

 

Hooman Hematian

 

Department of Veterinary sciences, Yasooj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Yasooj, Iran

 

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects ofdifferent doses of mercury on fetal testis. In this investigation 20 adult female rats were divided in four groups. All animals became pregnant by natural mating. Mercuric oxide was induced in three groups by different doses (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/Kg/day) at 10 terminal days of pregnancy. After parturition, male offspring were reared for 60 days. At the end of the experiment (60 days after birth), the body weights of neonates were measured (after birth and also 60 days after birth) and the testes were isolated from the
offspring of all rats, also the blood serum was isolated and used for endocrine analysis. Various histological parameters were determined using histological techniques. These parameters were included the thicknessof testicular capsule (µm), the number of seminiferous tubules (/mm2), the number of Sertoli, leydig and spermatogonia cells (/mm2), and the seminiferous tubules’ diameter (µm). Results revealed decreases in the LH, FSH and testosterone hormones, and body weight in the experimental groups. The diameters of the seminiferous tubules, and the numbers of the spermatogonia, sertoli cells andleydig cells have decreased significantly in experimental group by 2 mg/Kg/day dose. Mercury exposure exhibited deleterious effects on male gonads during fetal life by alterations in the hormones and testicular cell numbers and this disorder remains persistent during the post-neonatal period.

 

 

Keywords: Male Hormones, Mercury, Offspring, Rat, Testis

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Common sense understanding of infertility among Ghanaian women with infertility

 

Journal of Infertility and reproductive Biology, 2014, Volume 2, Issue 1, Pages 11-22, Full Text in PDF (107 KB)

 

Naab F1, Roger L.B2, Heidrich S3

 

1. Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Nursing, P.O. Box LG 43, College of Health Sciences,University of Ghana, Ghana
2. Schools of Nursing, Medicine and Public Health, H6/273 Clinical Science Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI 53792, USA
3. William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital 2500 Overlook Terrace, B6073, Madison, WI 53705, 256-1901 X12982, USA
 

 

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe women’s beliefs about infertility and the socio-demographic and infertility-related health correlates of those beliefs. The study was a descriptive cross sectional survey. Women (N = 203) who were receiving treatment for infertility at two publichospitals in Ghana completed the Fertility Belief Questionnaire (FBQ) and questions about their socio-demographic and infertility-related health status.Confirmatory factor analyses of the FBQ and correlations among beliefs and socio-demographics and infertility-related health variables were examined. Six dimensions of beliefs were described: timeline chronic/acute, consequences, illness coherence, personal control,treatment control, andcause. Over 80% of the women believed that infertility is an acute problem. The majority agreed that there are negative consequences of infertility. Over 70% agreed that they had poor understanding of their infertility but believed that there was something they could personally or medically do to control their infertility (87%). Women with higher levels of education were more likely to report they understood their infertility and had personal control over their infertility. Women who were married for fewer years were significantly more likely to report negative consequences of infertility, that they had a poor understanding of their infertility and were less likely to endorse stress and supernatural causes of infertility. Womenwith infertility in Ghana have beliefs about infertility that may influence their health behaviors. There is a need to explore these beliefs and their influence on the health outcomes of women with infertility in Ghana.

 

 

Keywords: Infertility, Common sense, Ghanaian women

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Histomorphometrical changes of rat uterine and ovarian tissues fed chloroform fraction of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) extracts

 

Journal of Infertility and reproductive Biology, 2014, Volume 2, Issue 1, Pages 23-29, Full Text in PDF (880 KB)

 

Monsefi M, Masudi M

 

Biology Department, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran

 

Abstract

The effects of dill (Anethum graveolensL.) seed extracts have studied previously. Study of different fractions of an extract helps us to understand which one of its components act on target organs. In this study, 42 female rats were divided into 6 groups of control, sham, and low (0.5, 0.045 g/kg) and high (5, 0.45 g/kg) doses of chloroform fraction of dill seed aqueous and ethanol extracts.During 10 days, rats received 1ml of extracts, then uterus and ovary were removed and their histological sections were prepared, stained by H&E and Masson’s trichrome and then morphometry was performed. Glycoconjugates of cell surface of reproductive organs were stained bylectins DBA, PNA, UEA, ConA and SBA) and their intensity ofreactions were measured by Imag-Java software. Morphological studies showed that uterine diameter was decreased in low dose of aqueous extract and high dose of ethanol extract. Myometrial diameter was decreased by high dose of ethanol extract. Histological studies using lectin ConA revealed lower intensity of reactions of oocyte cell membrane, endometrial and myometrial layers in high dose of ethanol extract treated group compared to the control group. It was concluded that chloroform fraction of dill extracts can affect female reproductive organs.

 

Keywords: Chloroform fraction, Dill extracts, Histomorphometry, Lectin histochemistry, Ovary, Uterus

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 Restoration of fertility in male rats exposed to lead by testosterone

 

Journal of Infertility and reproductive Biology, 2014, Volume 2, Issue 1, Pages 30-35, Full Text in PDF (83 KB)

 

Reshma Anjum M1, Hari Priya P1, Madhu P1, Pratap Reddy K1, Sreenivasula Reddy P2
 
1. Department of Biotechnology, S.V. University, Tirupati-517502, India
2. Department of Zoology, S.V. University, Tirupati-517502, India 

 

Abstract

Lead or lead together with testosterone was given to adult rats in order to assess the protective effect of testosterone supplementation on lead-induced suppressed fertility in male rats. Male Wistar rats were exposed to lead acetate at dose level of 0.05 and 0.15 % for 55 days through drinking water and injected intraperitoneally with either testoviron depot at a dose of 4.16 mg/Kg body weight or vehicle alone on day 1, 7 and 14. To assess the fertility, control and experimental males were cohabited with sexually mature 100 day old females for 8 days. Significant decrease in mating index and fertility index were observed with an increase in conception time with male rats exposed to lead. Significant decrease was alsoobserved in fertility rate, measured by counting live fetuses in the uterus of females mated with males exposed to lead.Pre- and post- implantation losses were increased significantly in females mated with lead exposed males. Testosterone supplementation restored the suppressed fertility in Pb-exposed rats. These data demonstrate that fertilization capacity of adult male rats exposed to lead decreased significantly and testosterone supplementation mitigated lead-induced suppressed male fertility.
Keywords:Lead acetate, Rat, Testosterone, Fertility, Implantation

 

Keywords: Lead acetate, Rat, Testosterone, Fertility, Implantation

 


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